Can You Take CBD Oil With Naltrexone

CBDISTILLERY

Buy CBD Oil Online

We previously reported that both cannabidiol (CBD) and low‑dose naltrexone (LDN) exhibit complex effects on G‑protein coupled receptors, which can impact the expression and function of other members of this superfamily. These receptors feed into and interact with central signalling cascades that determine the ease by which cells engage in apoptosis, and can be used as a way to prime cancer cells to other treatments. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of combining these two agents on cancer cell lines in vitro and in a mouse model, and focused on how the sequence of administration may affect the overall action. The results showed both agents had minimal effect on cell numbers when used simultaneously; however, the combination of LDN and CBD, delivered in this specific sequence, significantly reduced the number of cells, and was superior to the regimen where the order of the agents was reversed. For example, there was a 35% reduction in cell numbers when using LDN before CBD compared to a 22% reduction when using CBD before LDN. The two agents also sensitised cells to chemotherapy as significant decreases in cell viability were observed when they were used before chemotherapy. In mouse models, the use of both agents enhanced the effect of gemcitabine, and crucially, their use resulted in no significant toxicity in the mice, which actually gained more weight compared to those without this pre‑treatment (+6.5 vs. 0%). Overall, the results highlight the importance of drug sequence when using these drugs. There is also a need to translate these observations into standard chemotherapy regimens, especially for common tumour types where treatment is often not completed due to toxicities. Combination of cannabidiol with low‑dose naltrexone increases the anticancer action of chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo We previously reported that both cannabidiol (CBD) and low‑dose

Combination of cannabidiol with low‑dose naltrexone increases the anticancer action of chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo

We previously reported that both cannabidiol (CBD) and low‑dose naltrexone (LDN) exhibit complex effects on G‑protein coupled receptors, which can impact the expression and function of other members of this superfamily. These receptors feed into and interact with central signalling cascades that determine the ease by which cells engage in apoptosis, and can be used as a way to prime cancer cells to other treatments. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of combining these two agents on cancer cell lines in vitro and in a mouse model, and focused on how the sequence of administration may affect the overall action. The results showed both agents had minimal effect on cell numbers when used simultaneously; however, the combination of LDN and CBD, delivered in this specific sequence, significantly reduced the number of cells, and was superior to the regimen where the order of the agents was reversed. For example, there was a 35% reduction in cell numbers when using LDN before CBD compared to a 22% reduction when using CBD before LDN. The two agents also sensitised cells to chemotherapy as significant decreases in cell viability were observed when they were used before chemotherapy. In mouse models, the use of both agents enhanced the effect of gemcitabine, and crucially, their use resulted in no significant toxicity in the mice, which actually gained more weight compared to those without this pre‑treatment (+6.5 vs. 0%). Overall, the results highlight the importance of drug sequence when using these drugs. There is also a need to translate these observations into standard chemotherapy regimens, especially for common tumour types where treatment is often not completed due to toxicities.

See also  CBD Vape Oil
Citation:

Liu, W. M., Hall, N. K., Liu, H. S., Hood, F. L., & Dalgleish, A. G. (2022). Combination of cannabidiol with low‑dose naltrexone increases the anticancer action of chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. Oncology Reports, 47(4), 1-10.

Combination of cannabidiol with low‑dose naltrexone increases the anticancer action of chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo

We previously reported that both cannabidiol (CBD) and low‑dose naltrexone (LDN) exhibit complex effects on G‑protein coupled receptors, which can impact the expression and function of other members of this superfamily. These receptors feed into and interact with central signalling cascades that determine the ease by which cells engage in apoptosis, and can be used as a way to prime cancer cells to other treatments. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of combining these two agents on cancer cell lines in vitro and in a mouse model, and focused on how the sequence of administration may affect the overall action. The results showed both agents had minimal effect on cell numbers when used simultaneously; however, the combination of LDN and CBD, delivered in this specific sequence, significantly reduced the number of cells, and was superior to the regimen where the order of the agents was reversed. For example, there was a 35% reduction in cell numbers when using LDN before CBD compared to a 22% reduction when using CBD before LDN. The two agents also sensitised cells to chemotherapy as significant decreases in cell viability were observed when they were used before chemotherapy. In mouse models, the use of both agents enhanced the effect of gemcitabine, and crucially, their use resulted in no significant toxicity in the mice, which actually gained more weight compared to those without this pre‑treatment (+6.5 vs. 0%). Overall, the results highlight the importance of drug sequence when using these drugs. There is also a need to translate these observations into standard chemotherapy regimens, especially for common tumour types where treatment is often not completed due to toxicities.

Li Z, You Y, Griffin N, Feng J and Shan F: Low-dose naltrexone (LDN): A promising treatment in immune-related diseases and cancer therapy. Int Immunopharmacol. 61:178–184. 2018. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Liu WM, Scott KA, Dennis JL, Kaminska E, Levett AJ and Dalgleish AG: Naltrexone at low doses upregulates a unique gene expression not seen with normal doses: Implications for its use in cancer therapy. Int J Oncol. 49:793–802. 2016. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Milligan G: G protein-coupled receptor hetero-dimerization: Contribution to pharmacology and function. Br J Pharmacol. 158:5–14. 2009. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Nieto Gutierrez A and McDonald PH: GPCRs: Emerging anti-cancer drug targets. Cell Signal. 41:65–74. 2018. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Sanchez-Vega F, Mina M, Armenia J, Chatila WK, Luna A, La KC, Dimitriadoy S, Liu DL, Kantheti HS, Saghafinia S, et al: Oncogenic signaling pathways in the cancer genome atlas. Cell. 173:321–337.e10. 2018. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

See also  Yensa CBD Superfood Dual Cleansing Oil

Arzimanoglou A, Brandl U, Cross JH, Gil-Nagel A, Lagae L, Landmark CJ, Specchio N, Nabbout R, Thiele EA, Gubbay O, et al: Epilepsy and cannabidiol: A guide to treatment. Epileptic Disord. 22:1–14. 2020.PubMed/NCBI

Massi P, Solinas M, Cinquina V and Parolaro D: Cannabidiol as potential anticancer drug. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 75:303–312. 2013. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

McPartland JM, Glass M and Pertwee RG: Meta-analysis of cannabinoid ligand binding affinity and receptor distribution: Interspecies differences. Br J Pharmacol. 152:583–593. 2007. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Shahbazi F, Grandi V, Banerjee A and Trant JF: Cannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors: The story so far. iScience. 23:1013012020. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Wada T and Penninger JM: Mitogen-activated protein kinases in apoptosis regulation. Oncogene. 23:2838–2849. 2004. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Shamas-Din A, Kale J, Leber B and Andrews DW: Mechanisms of action of Bcl-2 family proteins. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 5:a0087142013. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Adams JM and Cory S: Bcl-2-regulated apoptosis: Mechanism and therapeutic potential. Curr Opin Immunol. 19:488–496. 2007. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Hardwick JM and Soane L: Multiple functions of BCL-2 family proteins. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 5:a0087222013. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Zhang L, Lu Z and Zhao X: Targeting Bcl-2 for cancer therapy. Biochim Biophys Acta Rev Cancer. 1876:1885692021. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Shrivastava A, Kuzontkoski PM, Groopman JE and Prasad A: Cannabidiol induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells by coordinating the cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy. Mol Cancer Ther. 10:1161–1172. 2011. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Liu WM, Fowler DW, Smith P and Dalgleish AG: Pre-treatment with chemotherapy can enhance the antigenicity and immunogenicity of tumours by promoting adaptive immune responses. Br J Cancer. 102:115–123. 2010. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Scott KA, Dalgleish AG and Liu WM: Anticancer effects of phytocannabinoids used with chemotherapy in leukaemia cells can be improved by altering the sequence of their administration. Int J Oncol. 51:369–377. 2017. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Scott KA, Shah S, Dalgleish AG and Liu WM: Enhancing the activity of cannabidiol and other cannabinoids in vitro through modifications to drug combinations and treatment schedules. Anticancer Res. 33:4373–4380. 2013.PubMed/NCBI

Liubchenko K, Kordbacheh K, Khajehdehi N, Visnjevac T, Ma F, Khan JS, Storey M, Abd-Elsayed A and Visnjevac O: Naltrexone’s impact on cancer progression and mortality: A systematic review of studies in humans, animal models, and cell cultures. Adv Ther. 38:904–924. 2021. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

National Cancer Institute, . PDQ ® integrative, alternative and complementary therapies editorial board. Cannabis and cannabinoids (PDQ ® ): Health professional version. 2021 Jun 3. PDQ Cancer Information Summaries. National Cancer Institute (US); Bethesda, MD: 2002, https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/cannabis-pdqOctober 15–2021PubMed/NCBI

Viudez-Martínez A, García-Gutiérrez MS, Fraguas-Sánchez AI, Torres-Suárez AI and Manzanares J: Effects of cannabidiol plus naltrexone on motivation and ethanol consumption. Br J Pharmacol. 175:3369–3378. 2018. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Rios C, Gomes I and Devi LA: mu Opioid and CB1 cannabinoid receptor interactions: Reciprocal inhibition of receptor signaling and neuritogenesis. Br J Pharmacol. 148:387–395. 2006. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Kovalchuk O and Kovalchuk I: Cannabinoids as anticancer therapeutic agents. Cell Cycle. 19:961–989. 2020. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Qu N, Meng Y, Handley MK, Wang C and Shan F: Preclinical and clinical studies into the bioactivity of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) for oncotherapy. Int Immunopharmacol. 96:1077142021. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

See also  How Much CBD Oil Can One Plant Produce

Liu WM, Fowler DW and Dalgleish AG: Cannabis-derived substances in cancer therapy-an emerging anti-inflammatory role for the cannabinoids. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 5:281–287. 2010. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Manzanares J, Ortiz S, Oliva JM, Pérez-Rial S and Palomo T: Interactions between cannabinoid and opioid receptor systems in the mediation of ethanol effects. Alcohol Alcohol. 40:25–34. 2005. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Bushlin I, Gupta A, Stockton SD Jr, Miller LK and Devi LA: Dimerization with cannabinoid receptors allosterically modulates delta opioid receptor activity during neuropathic pain. PLoS One. 7:e497892012. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Allouche S, Noble F and Marie N: Opioid receptor desensitization: Mechanisms and its link to tolerance. Front Pharmacol. 5:2802014. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Lohse MJ and Hofmann KP: Spatial and temporal aspects of signaling by G-protein-coupled receptors. Mol Pharmacol. 88:572–578. 2015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Sever R and Brugge JS: Signal transduction in cancer. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 5:a0060982015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Liu F, Yang X, Geng M and Huang M: Targeting ERK, an achilles’ heel of the MAPK pathway, in cancer therapy. Acta Pharm Sin B. 8:552–562. 2018. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Howlett AC: Cannabinoid receptor signaling. Handb Exp Pharmacol. 168:53–79. 2005. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Mebratu Y and Tesfaigzi Y: How ERK1/2 activation controls cell proliferation and cell death: Is subcellular localization the answer? Cell Cycle. 8:1168–1175. 2009. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Go YY, Kim SR, Kim DY, Chae SW and Song JJ: Cannabidiol enhances cytotoxicity of anti-cancer drugs in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Sci Rep. 10:206222020. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Seltzer ES, Watters AK, MacKenzie D Jr, Granat LM and Zhang D: Cannabidiol (CBD) as a promising anti-cancer drug. Cancers (Basel). 12:32032020. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Pagano C, Navarra G, Coppola L, Bifulco M and Laezza C: Molecular mechanism of cannabinoids in cancer progression. Int J Mol Sci. 22:36802021. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Ma M, Wang X, Liu N, Shan F and Feng Y: Low-dose naltrexone inhibits colorectal cancer progression and promotes apoptosis by increasing M1-type macrophages and activating the Bax/Bcl-2/caspase-3/PARP pathway. Int Immunopharmacol. 83:1063882020. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Sharma V and McNeill JH: To scale or not to scale: The principles of dose extrapolation. Br J Pharmacol. 157:907–921. 2009. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Kleckner AS, Kleckner IR, Kamen CS, Tejani MA, Janelsins MC, Morrow GR and Peppone LJ: Opportunities for cannabis in supportive care in cancer. Ther Adv Med Oncol. 11:17588359198663622019. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Cant R, Dalgleish AG and Allen RL: Naltrexone inhibits IL-6 and TNFα production in human immune cell subsets following stimulation with ligands for intracellular toll-like receptors. Front Immunol. 8:8092017. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Dalgleish A and Liu W: Chapter 9-cancer. The LDN book: How a little-known generic drug-Low Dose Naltrexone-could revolutionize treatment for autoimmune diseases, cancer, autism, depression and more. Elsegood L: Chelsea Green Publishing; London: pp. 143–151. 2016

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 3 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.